Best-Ever Wild Mushroom Ragu

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This Best-Ever Wild Mushroom Ragu is seriously bold, rich, & flavorful Italian-style comfort food, & it's totally meatless! Fragrant aromatics like garlic & fresh thyme simmer in a porcini-infused stock to create the ultimate rich & earthy mushroom flavor. Add some crispy pan-roasted wild mushrooms, freshly grated parmesan, & a drizzle of truffle oil for an extra-luxe finishing touch. Toss the hearty mushroom sauce into pappardelle or spaghetti for the best comforting mushroom ragu pasta, or spoon it over gnocchi or polenta for an extra-cozy Italian-inspired dinner.

Naturally meatless, easily vegetarian, vegan, & dairy-free.

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A side angle shot of a serving of wild mushroom ragu pasta inside of a brown speckled ceramic bowl. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs and has gold silverware resting inside of the bowl. The bowl sits atop a creamy white textured surface with a light gray linen napkin, a small wooden pinch bowl filled with black pepper, and a glass of white wine resting alongside.

The Best Meatless Italian-Style Comfort Food: Wild Mushroom Ragu Pasta

Ragu is one of my all-time favorite foods, to eat & to cook. I’d even go so far as to say it’s my culinary specialty! I was first introduced to the beauty of this style of Italian meat sauce at the fine dining Italian restaurant, where I worked after college. I was so obsessed with the various ragu pasta dishes our chefs whipped up on any given week that ragu was one of the first things I taught myself how to cook.

& in the past 10+ years since, I haven’t stopped! We’ve shared a number of ragu recipes here on PWWB over the years – Slowly Braised Lamb Ragu, Short Rib Ragu, Pork Ragu, even Bolognese! – but there’s yet to be a meatless ragu recipe…until now, that is!

This Wild Mushroom Ragu just might be one of my all-time favorite pasta recipes we’ve shared here on PWWB. The use of 3 different types of mushrooms creates a well-rounded mushroom flavor, while loads of fragrant aromatics, fresh herbs, & a porcini-infused stock help build a sauce that’s seriously rich & hearty. I guarantee you won’t miss the meat!

If you’ve tried our other ragu recipes, you’ll notice the ingredients list & technique used for this wild mushroom ragu is slightly different. First, its ingredients list is much simpler – it doesn’t make use of soffritto or any tomatoes, which ensures the earthy mushroom flavor is really the star of the dish. Second, it has a much quicker cook time than braised meat ragu – the mushroom ragu sauce itself only simmers for about 10 minutes!

Essentially, you can whip up the coziest bowl of hearty ragu pasta any night of the week, & I don’t think life gets much better than that!

A close up macro shot of finished mushroom ragu pasta garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs.

Mushroom Ragu Recipe Highlights

This Wild Mushroom Ragu recipe is the best ever because it’s…

  • MUSHROOM HEAVEN. This wild mushroom ragu recipe uses 3 different kinds of mushrooms – fresh & dried! – for a well-rounded flavor. Easily customize it to use the mushrooms you love most!
  • RICH & HEARTY. Mushrooms create loads of savory, umami richness in this meatless ragu sauce, cooking down into tender bites with crispy-brown edges for a familiar meaty texture.
  • THE FASTEST RAGU EVER. While slowly braised meat ragu takes hours to make, this wild mushroom ragu is ready in 1 hour or less. Super quick & easy!

The ultimate meatless Italian comfort food! ♡ Read on to learn more about how to make Wild Mushroom Ragu, or jump straight to the recipe & get cooking!

A side angle shot of a serving of wild mushroom ragu pasta inside of a brown speckled ceramic bowl. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs and has gold silverware resting inside of the bowl. The bowl sits atop a creamy white textured surface with a light gray linen napkin, a small wooden pinch bowl filled with black pepper, and a glass of white wine resting alongside.

First Thing’s First – What is Ragu?

Let’s chat ragu for a moment! I first was introduced to ragu in my days working as a server at a fine dining Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. One of our specialties was a rotating ragu della casa (house ragu), which would change every week based on what the chefs were in the mood to cook & serve. “What is ragu?!” was always our guests’ most frequently asked question!

“Ragu” is a broad term used to describe a rich, slowly cooked Italian meat sauce. It’s hearty, intensely flavorful, & unlike a slowly simmered marinara or tomato sauce, ragu is all about the meat. In that sense, it’s almost more stew-like than what may come to mind when you think of Italian sauces. However, much like marinara or tomato sauce, ragu is traditionally served with pasta, gnocchi or polenta. Perhaps, without even knowing it, you’ve enjoyed arguably the most famous ragu – bolognese!

The fun part about learning how to make ragu is that it’s infinitely versatile. You can make a showstopping ragu sauce using almost any meat – like beef short ribspork, wild boar, lamb, duck – or make a meatless ragu sauce using a meaty vegetable like eggplant or, of course, mushrooms!

This particular wild mushroom ragu recipe delivers the same rich & hearty flavor of ragu, but without the meat! Instead, it uses 3 types of mushrooms – cremini mushrooms, beautiful wild mushrooms, & decadent porcini mushrooms – to deliver the ultimate mushroom flavor. The mushrooms simmer with garlic, herbs, & vermouth, creating an intensely aromatic & boldly flavored sauce that’s perfect to toss into pasta or serve over polenta.

If you’ve never made ragu before, don’t worry! I’ve been cooking various ragu recipes for the past 10+ years (ever since my serving days!). It’s one of my absolute favorite things to cook, so you’re in good hands here.

Key Ingredients for the Best Mushroom Ragu

Wild Mushroom Ragu ingredients arranged on a creamy white textured surface: cremini mushrooms, maitake mushrooms, dried porcini mushrooms, vegetable stock, yellow onion, garlic, fresh thyme, dry vermouth, grated parmesan, heavy cream, and pasta.

Note: Full ingredients list & measurements provided in the Recipe Card, below.

Like the best Italian-style dishes, this mushroom ragu recipe uses a very simple list of ingredients, but it’s all about using the highest quality you can find & giving them a little TLC to create an absolutely beautiful meal. You will need…

  • Mushrooms – This wild mushroom ragu recipe uses a mix of wild mushrooms (I love maitake mushrooms, which are also called hen of the woods), cremini mushrooms (aka baby bella), & dried porcini mushrooms. Together they create a well-rounded blend of all the flavors mushrooms have to offer!
  • Aromatics – The base of this ragu sauce is a fragrant layer of yellow onion, garlic, & fresh thyme.
  • Vegetable stock – Or vegetable broth, if that’s what you have on hand!
  • Dry vermouth – Originating in France, dry vermouth is a fortified wine infused with herbs & botanicals. It has a slightly more complex flavor than wine & pairs beautifully with mushrooms! Using boldly flavored vermouth is especially important to build richness in a meatless dish. If you don’t have vermouth, you can also use a dry white wine.
  • Grated parmesan & heavy cream – For an extra layer of richness & creaminess that helps bring the mushroom ragu pasta together.
Ingredient Spotlight

The Best Mushrooms for Mushroom Ragu

Because they’re the star of the show here, this wild mushroom ragu is loaded with 3 different kinds of fresh & dried mushrooms.

Fresh mushrooms are irresistibly hearty & provide a meaty texture perfect for ragu. Feel free to use the fresh mushrooms you love most or what’s most readily available wherever you are. I love balancing splurge-worthy wild mushrooms like maitake mushrooms (pictured, though oyster, chanterelle, & shiitake mushrooms are fantastic!) with a more cost-effective mushroom like cremini (aka baby bella, pictured, though simple white button mushrooms work great too!).

Porcini mushrooms are the third type of mushroom used in this recipe. They’re an Italian variety famous for their especially rich & deep umami flavor. Dried porcini mushrooms are typically much more affordable & accessible than fresh here in the States. Dried mushrooms are a cost-effective way to get the big, bold flavor of typically more expensive wild mushrooms like porcini. You can find them in the bulk or dry goods section of most grocery stores, or buy them online. The key is to reconstitute dried mushrooms with a liquid to easily capture their flavor.

How to Make an Epic Ragu Mushroom Sauce

Full Recipe Directions, including step-by-step photos, are included in the Recipe Card, below.

*Mushroom Tip!

Resist the urge to add salt when you sauté mushrooms. Salt pulls out the mushroom’s natural moisture, preventing them from browning. Instead, season the mushrooms once they’ve browned & developed good color.

1

Reconstitute dried porcini mushrooms. Simply combine vegetable broth & dried porcini mushrooms in a small saucepan & simmer for about 10 minutes. Why? ⇢ This step is a total flavor booster! The warm broth softens the dried mushrooms, awakening their natural flavor & making them easy to chop up & add to wild mushroom ragu sauce. Plus, as the mushrooms reconstitute, they infuse a rich umami flavor into the broth, which is later used to build the mushroom ragu pasta.

2

Brown the fresh mushrooms. Start by heating some olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot like a Dutch oven. Add the fresh mushrooms, stirring occasionally until they turn a deep golden brown. This takes a little while, but it’s so well worth the time! Why? ⇢ Browning the mushrooms creates rich umami flavor, through the Maillard reaction, & the best texture – soft but not mushy, with crispy browned edges. Be sure to work in batches, as needed, to avoid overcrowding the pan!

3

Cook the aromatics. Once the fresh mushrooms are browned, use the same pot to cook onions until softened & fragrant. From there, add the chopped reconstituted porcini mushrooms, garlic, & fresh thyme. Why? ⇢ Cooking the aromatics releases their flavor & builds a strong foundation for the wild mushroom ragu sauce. Taking 10 minutes to get everything nice & browned creates richer flavor in the final dish.

4

Deglaze. Turn the heat up on the pan & pour in the dry vermouth, stirring constantly to scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pot. Simmer until the vermouth is almost completely absorbed into the aromatics – your kitchen will smell heavenly at this point! Why? ⇢ This step is known as “deglazing,” which is fancy-speak for adding a little bit of liquid to a hot pot. The steam from the liquid helps release the browned bits on the bottom of the hot pan – they’re full of flavor!

5

Build & simmer the mushroom ragu sauce. Build the ragu by stirring in the porcini-infused stock & grated parmesan cheese. Simmer until the ragu starts to thicken slightly. Finish by stirring in the heavy cream & browned mushrooms, then taste & add more salt or pepper as desired.

How to make mushroom ragu sauce, step 6: build & simmer the mushroom ragu. A porcini-infused stock rests inside of a green Staub cocotte. Heavy cream & browned fresh mushrooms are added to the pot & a wooden spoon rests inside of the pot to help build the mushroom ragu. The cocotte sits atop a creamy textured surface.

Easy Recipe Variations – Vegetarian &/or Vegan Mushroom Ragu:

For a vegetarian mushroom ragu: Simply omit the parmesan or use your favorite rennet-free cheese in its place.

For a vegan mushroom ragu: Swap the parmesan with your favorite non-dairy alternative & omit the heavy cream or use your favorite non-dairy substitute in its place.

The Best Part! How to Make Mushroom Ragu Pasta

The wild mushroom ragu sauce is ready to serve once it’s prepared! Feel free to spoon it on top of a bowl of creamy polenta, or take a couple of extra steps to make a seriously restaurant-worthy mushroom ragu pasta.

Full Recipe Directions, including step-by-step photos, are included in the Recipe Card, below.

What’s the Best Pasta for Mushroom Ragu?

Choose a wide, hearty pasta that can stand up to the heartiness of the ragu. Mushroom ragu pappardelle is one of my all-time favorites, but I also like to use mafaldine (pictured), as its ruffly edges add amazing texture. Other great mushroom ragu pasta options include rigatoni, paccheri, or a nice, big fusilli.

1

Boil the pasta. For a perfectly timed meal, begin cooking your pasta as the aromatics soften for the wild mushroom ragu. Generously season a pot of water, boil, then add the pasta & cook to al dente, stirring occasionally. Important! ⇢ Before draining the pasta, reserve about a cup of starchy pasta water. Pasta water is super valuable & helps the wild mushroom ragu sauce come together with the pasta. For more pasta tips, be sure to check out our guide on How to Cook Pasta Perfectly Every Single Time!

2

Toss to create mushroom ragu pasta. Once the wild mushroom ragu sauce is finished, add the cooked pasta into the pot with the sauce & gently toss to combine. Important! ⇢ Pasta should always cook with the sauce for a couple of minutes! The ragu sauce should evenly coat every nook & cranny of the pasta, allowing the two elements to come together as a single cohesive mushroom ragu pasta dish. Skipping this step is one of the biggest mistakes I see home cooks make.

3

Simmer & tweak as necessary. This step is all about feeling! If the wild mushroom ragu sauce needs to loosen up a little, add a touch of pasta water. If the pasta dish is too loose, add a handful of Parmesan cheese or a bit of heavy cream to bind things together. Once it feels right, let the pasta simmer with the wild mushroom ragu for a few minutes. The starch in the pasta will absorb some of the mushroom ragu sauce as it simmers, creating one cohesive dish.

A close up of finished Wild Mushroom Ragu pasta inside of a green Staub cocotte. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface with a small wooden pinch bowl filled with grated parmesan and a few sprigs of fresh thyme surrounding the cocotte.

Serving Suggestions & Other Recipe Tips

Mushroom Ragu Pasta Serving Suggestions. ⇢ Pile your mushroom ragu pasta into your favorite serving bowls, then finish with extra grated parmesan & fresh chopped herbs, like parsley or a little extra fresh thyme. I also love to add a drizzle of black truffle oil for an extra-luxe finishing touch.

Leftovers & Reheating. ⇢ Like most ragu, this wild mushroom ragu only gets better with time. The longer the sauce sits, the more its rich flavors start to meld together. Once prepared, you can store the mushroom ragu sauce in the refrigerator for use throughout the week. Simply reheat in a skillet as you boil a fresh pot of pasta, toss it all together, & you’re good to go. Check the Recipe Notes, below, for full Storage & Reheating guidance.

A serving of wild mushroom ragu pasta fills a brown speckled ceramic bowl. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs. The bowl sits atop a creamy white textured surface with a light gray linen napkin, a small wooden pinch bowl filled with fresh herbs & a few loose sprigs of fresh herbs sprinkled loosely alongside. Two gold forks rest inside of the bowl of pasta.

I can’t wait for you to try this Wild Mushroom Ragu recipe! I truly believe it’s the best mushroom pasta dish you can make at home – & I’m pretty sure that once you try it, you’ll agree! If you do give it a try, be sure to let me know! Leave a comment with a star rating below. You can also snap a photo & tag @playswellwithbutter on Instagram. I LOVE hearing about & seeing your PWWB creations!

Obsessed with Mushrooms? Be sure to try our Best-Ever Porcini Mushroom Risotto, Creamy Marsala Pasta with Mushrooms, or this Seriously Good Pork Marsala with Mushrooms next. ♡ Happy cooking!

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Best-Ever Wild Mushroom Ragu

  • Author: Jess Larson
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: serves 4-6 1x
  • Category: Pasta Recipes, Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Italian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

“Ragu” is a broad term used to describe a rich, slowly cooked Italian meat sauce. It’s hearty, intensely flavorful, & unlike a slowly simmered marinara or tomato sauce, ragu is all about the meat (or a meaty ingredient, like mushrooms!). 

I learned how to cook ragu 10+ years ago, working at a fine dining Northern Italian restaurant. To this day, it’s one of my favorite things to cook! We’ve shared many ragu recipes over the years here on PWWB, but never a meatless version…until now! 

This Wild Mushroom Ragu recipe delivers the same rich & hearty flavor of ragu, but without the meat. Instead, it uses 3 types of mushrooms – cremini mushrooms, beautiful wild mushrooms, & decadent porcini mushrooms – to create the ultimate mushroom flavor. The mushrooms simmer with garlic, herbs, & vermouth, creating an intensely aromatic & boldly flavored sauce that’s perfect to toss into pasta or serve over polenta.

Since they’re the star of the dish, be sure to use the highest quality mushrooms you can find (refer to the Recipe Notes, below, for suggested mushroom varieties). Take time to really brown them well, which develops both their flavor & texture. 

While it’s a completely meatless dish, the use of parmesan & heavy cream prevents it from being strictly vegetarian or vegan. However, with a couple of very simple tweaks, you can easily make your mushroom ragu free of dairy & animal rennet – refer to the Recipe Notes, below, for guidance. 


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 cup olive oil, divided
  • 16 ounces cremini mushrooms (baby bella), trimmed & sliced
  • 16 ounces maitake mushrooms (or wild mushroom of choice), trimmed & torn into bite-sized pieces
  • one 1-ounce package dried porcini mushrooms (see Recipe Notes)
  • 2 cups vegetable stock or broth
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped or grated
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (about 810 sprigs)
  • 1 cup dry vermouth (see Recipe Notes)
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 12 ounces pasta of choice
  • kosher salt & ground black pepper, to season
  • for serving, as desired: black truffle oil, grated parmesan, finely chopped fresh herbs, etc.

Instructions

  1. Brown the fresh mushrooms: Add 3 tablespoons of olive oil to a large, heavy-bottomed pot (such as a Dutch oven) over medium-high heat. Once hot & shimmering, add half of the mushrooms. Stir to coat the mushrooms in the oil then cook, stirring occasionally, until deeply browned & golden, about 8-10 minutes. Once browned, season with a good pinch of kosher salt & ground black pepper as desired. Transfer the browned mushrooms to a plate & set aside. Repeat with the remaining mushrooms. How to make wild mushroom ragu step 1: fresh mushrooms brown in the bottom of a green Staub cocotte. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  2. Reconstitute the porcini mushrooms: Meanwhile, as the fresh mushrooms brown, reconstitute the dried porcini mushrooms. Add the vegetable broth & dried porcini mushrooms to a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil & reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Simmer 10 minutes to reconstitute the mushrooms. Use a slotted spoon or spider strainer to remove the mushrooms from the pot, allowing all excess liquid to drain back into the pot. Remove the porcini-infused stock from the heat & set aside for later use. Transfer reconstituted porcini mushrooms to a cutting board & finely chop. Set aside. How to make mushroom ragu sauce, step 2: reconstitute the dried porcini mushrooms. Porcini mushrooms that have been reconstituted with vegetable stock rest inside of a small gray Staub pot. A gold spider strainer with a wooden handle lifts a few porcini mushrooms out of the vegetable stock liquid and the pot sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  3. Cook the aromatics: Once the fresh mushrooms are browned, cook the aromatics. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil to the same pot used to brown the mushrooms. Reduce heat to medium. Once hot & shimmering, add the onions. Season with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt & ground black pepper, as desired. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened & fragrant, about 5-6 minutes. Add the chopped porcini mushrooms from Step 2 & cook, stirring occasionally, until most of the moisture is cooked out, about 1-2 minutes. Add in the garlic & fresh thyme. Cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes longer.How to make mushroom ragu sauce, step 3: cook the aromatics. Onions and garlic brown inside of a green Staub cocotte in oil. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  4. Boil the pasta: While the aromatics soften, it’s a great time to get your pasta going. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook, stirring occasionally, until the pasta is cooked to al dente according to package directions. Carefully dip a liquid measuring cup into the pot, reserving about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water, and set aside. Carefully drain the pasta – do NOT rinse it!How to make mushroom ragu pasta, step 4: boil the pasta. A fine mesh strainer filled with drained mafaldine pasta rests atop a dark blue Staub cocotte. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  5. Deglaze: Increasing the heat to medium-high, pour the dry vermouth into the pot. Stir constantly, using a wooden spoon to scrape up any browned bits that may have formed at the bottom of the pot. Cook for 3-4 minutes, until the vermouth is almost completely absorbed into the aromatics.How to make mushroom ragu sauce, step 3: cook the aromatics. Onions and garlic brown inside of a green Staub cocotte in oil. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  6. Build & simmer the mushroom ragu: Add the porcini-infused stock from Step 3 to the pot, along with the grated parmesan. Stir to combine. Bring the ragu to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer 5-7 minutes, until thickened slightly. Stir in the heavy cream & the browned mushrooms from Step 1. Taste & adjust seasonings as desired.How to make mushroom ragu sauce, step 6: build & simmer the mushroom ragu. A porcini-infused stock rests inside of a green Staub cocotte. Heavy cream & browned fresh mushrooms are added to the pot & a wooden spoon rests inside of the pot to help build the mushroom ragu. The cocotte sits atop a creamy textured surface.
  7. Finish the wild mushroom ragu pasta: Add the cooked pasta to the pot with the wild mushroom ragu sauce, tossing to coat. The wild mushroom ragu should evenly coat the pasta. Add in some of the reserved pasta water if the ragu needs to loosen up a little; add in an extra handful of parmesan if it needs to tighten up a little. Cook over medium heat for 1-2 minutes, allowing the pasta to meld with & absorb some of the wild mushroom ragu.How to make wild mushroom ragu, step 7: finish the mushroom ragu pasta. Cooked pasta is added to & tossed with a wild mushroom ragu sauce in a green Staub cocotte. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface.
  8. Serve: Portion the wild mushroom ragu pasta into individual pasta bowls, topping with additional grated parmesan & chopped fresh herbs as desired. For an extra-luxe finishing touch, I like to finish each bowl with the lightest drizzle of black truffle oil. Serve immediately. Enjoy!Finished Wild Mushroom Ragu pasta fills a green Staub cocotte. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs. The cocotte sits atop a creamy white textured surface with two small wood pinch bowls filled with grated parmesan and ground black pepper, fresh sprigs of thyme, and a light gray linen napkin surround the cocotte.


Notes

  • Ingredient Notes:
    • Best mushrooms for mushroom ragu: I like to make wild mushroom ragu using 2 types of fresh mushrooms – I like to splurge for really beautiful wild mushrooms – maitake (pictured), oyster, chanterelle, & shiitake are all great – but then balance them out with more cost-effective mushrooms like simple white button mushrooms or cremini (baby bella) mushrooms (pictured). Use what you love most or what’s most readily available to you.  
    • Porcini mushrooms are an Italian mushroom with especially rich & deep umami flavor. Dried porcini mushrooms are cost-effective & typically more readily available throughout the year here in the States. Look for them in the bulk section or sold in in 1-ounce packages at grocery stores or natural food stores that stock dried mushrooms. You can also easily purchase dried porcini mushrooms online.
    • Dry vermouth: Originating in France, dry vermouth is a fortified wine infused with herbs & botanicals. Since dry vermouth is more boldly flavored than the average cooking wine, it adds an extra punch of aromatic goodness to whatever you’re cooking. If you don’t keep dry vermouth on hand, feel free to swap it out in this wild mushroom recipe with an equal amount of dry white wine, dry sherry, or dry marsala.
    • Vegetarian &/or vegan mushroom ragu: This wild mushroom ragu recipe is naturally meatless. For a vegetarian version, omit the parmesan or use your favorite rennet-free parmesan. To take it a step further & make it vegan, opt for your favorite non-dairy parmesan & omit the heavy cream or use your favorite non-dairy substitute. 
  • Make-Ahead, Storage & Reheating Instructions:
    • Make-Ahead: Mushroom ragu sauce stores incredibly well – it’s the type of thing that gets even better as it sits & its flavors have the chance to meld together. To store, prep the sauce through Step 6 of Recipe Directions, above. Once cooled, transfer to an airtight container & store in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. Whip up a batch of mushroom ragu pasta during the week by reheating the wild mushroom ragu sauce in a skillet, & completing the recipe according to Steps 4 + 7-8, above.
    • Storage & Reheating: Leftover mushroom ragu pasta will keep, stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator, for up to 4 days. Reheat on the stovetop or in the microwave, adding an extra splash of water or cooking stock to loosen up the ragu sauce as needed, until warmed through. 
  • 15-Minute Meal Prep: Nearly all of the active prep work for this mushroom ragu recipe comes from prepping the veggies. Slice & dice in advance to get a head start on your mushroom ragu – it takes 15 minutes, tops:
    • Dice 1 medium yellow onion & store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. (<5 minutes active prep)
    • Clean, trim & prep the mushrooms as indicated in the Ingredients List, above. Place them in a paper towel-lined bowl & store in the main compartment of your refrigerator for up to 5 days. (10 minutes active prep)

Keywords: wild mushroom ragu, mushroom pasta, easy ragu recipe, vegetarian, vegan, plant-based

Recipe & Food Styling by Jess Larson, Plays Well With Butter | Photography by Rachel Cook, Half Acre House.

A serving of wild mushroom ragu pasta fills a brown speckled ceramic bowl. The pasta has been garnished with freshly grated parmesan and herbs. The bowl sits atop a creamy white textured surface with a few loose sprigs of fresh herbs sprinkled alongside.

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Hi there, I'm Jess!

If there’s 1 thing to know about me, it’s this: I am head-over-heels in love with food. I’m on a mission to make weeknight cooking flavorful, fast, & fun for other foodies, & PWWB is where I share foolproof recipes that deliver major flavor with minimal effort. Other true loves: pretty shoes, puppies, Grey’s Anatomy, & my cozy kitchen in Minneapolis, MN.

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Comments

  1. 4.16.22
    Kristina said:

    This was divine. Another home run for my family! Simple yet restaurant quality. Thank you for creating another recipe to add to my rotation!

    • 4.18.22
      Erin @ Plays Well With Butter said:

      Thanks so much Kristina! So thrilled to hear that you loved it & have found a new fave! 🙂

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A side angle shot of pasta tossed in San Marzano tomato sauce that is plated on a creamy white speckled plate. The pasta has been garnished with parmesan cheese and fresh chopped basil. The plate sits atop a creamy white surface with a light blue linen napkin tucked underneath the plate. A set of silverware rests alongside the plate and a few loose basil leaves and a small wooden pinch bowl filled with parmesan cheese rest just above the plate.